Steel Barrio

This book links a particular community in South Chicago to broader issues in twentieth-century U.S. history, including race and labor, urban immigration, and the segregation of cities.

Steel Barrio

Since the early twentieth century, thousands of Mexican Americans have lived, worked, and formed communities in Chicago’s steel mill neighborhoods. Drawing on individual stories and oral histories, Michael Innis-Jiménez tells the story of a vibrant, active community that continues to play a central role in American politics and society. Examining how the fortunes of Mexicans in South Chicago were linked to the environment they helped to build, Steel Barrio offers new insights into how and why Mexican Americans created community. This book investigates the years between the World Wars, the period that witnessed the first, massive influx of Mexicans into Chicago. South Chicago Mexicans lived in a neighborhood whose literal and figurative boundaries were defined by steel mills, which dominated economic life for Mexican immigrants. Yet while the mills provided jobs for Mexican men, they were neither the center of community life nor the source of collective identity. Steel Barrio argues that the Mexican immigrant and Mexican American men and women who came to South Chicago created physical and imagined community not only to defend against the ever-present social, political, and economic harassment and discrimination, but to grow in a foreign, polluted environment. Steel Barrio reconstructs the everyday strategies the working-class Mexican American community adopted to survive in areas from labor to sports to activism. This book links a particular community in South Chicago to broader issues in twentieth-century U.S. history, including race and labor, urban immigration, and the segregation of cities.

More Books:

Steel Barrio
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Michael Innis-Jiménez
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-06-17 - Publisher: NYU Press

Since the early twentieth century, thousands of Mexican Americans have lived, worked, and formed communities in Chicago’s steel mill neighborhoods. Drawing on individual stories and oral histories, Michael Innis-Jiménez tells the story of a vibrant, active community that continues to play a central role in American politics and society. Examining
Steel Barrio
Language: en
Pages: 235
Authors: Michael Innis-Jiménez
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-06-24 - Publisher: NYU Press

"The richly documented history of Mexican South Chicago here yields a sophisticated, rounded, and compelling study of the evolution of an immigrant place. Attentive to structural factors shaping migration and assimilation, Innis-Jiménez also tells textured human stories of the work, play, and solidarity that created and recreated an enduring community,
The Routledge History of Twentieth-Century America
Language: en
Pages: 420
Authors: Jerald Podair, Darren Dochuk
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-06-01 - Publisher: Routledge

The Routledge History of the Twentieth-Century United States is a comprehensive introduction to the most important trends and developments in the study of modern United States history. Driven by interdisciplinary scholarship, the thirty-four original chapters underscore the vast range of identities, perspectives and tensions that contributed to the growth and
Civic Labors
Language: en
Pages: 328
Authors: Dennis A. Deslippe, Eric Fure-Slocum, John W. McKerley
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-10-17 - Publisher: University of Illinois Press

Labor studies scholars and working-class historians have long worked at the crossroads of academia and activism. The essays in this collection examine the challenges and opportunities for engaged scholarship in the United States and abroad. A diverse roster of contributors discuss how participation in current labor and social struggles guides
From Steel to Slots
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Chloe E. Taft
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-04-06 - Publisher: Harvard University Press

Bethlehem PA was synonymous with steel. But after the factories closed, the city bet its future on casino gambling. Chloe Taft describes a city struggling to make sense of the ways global capitalism transforms jobs, landscapes, and identities. While residents often have few cards to play, the shape economic progress