Herbicidal Warfare

... crewmen would continue flying the two insecticide aircraft for several months more , but the project to save lives at the cost of vegetation was ended . Only the controversy over the US experiment in herbicidal warfare would go on .

Herbicidal Warfare

In 1961, the United States Air Force began using chemical herbicides as a weapon in South-east Asia. The tactic lasted only ten years, but the controversy it provoked continues to this day. Criticisms range from the charge that the herbicides did irreparable damage to the Asian environment to the recent "Agent Orange" lawsuits claiming that the chemicals have caused U.S. servicemen and their children physical and mental impairments. While much attention has been given to these claims, little light has been cast on the actual history of the herbicidal operation, code-named RANCH HAND. This book is the history of this unique aviation mission, from its conception to its termination. It describes how the operation dispensed over 11 million gallons of chemicals over Southeast Asian jungles and croplands while flying unarmed, obsolescent aircraft at tree-top level. Based on the author's own experiences, hundreds of interviews with RANCH HAND veterans, and careful research of declassified primary sources, this book provides a comprehensive and in-depth view of the men who flew the missions and their role in the events in Southeast Asia. It also reviews the scientific reaction to herbicidal warfare and hoe the controversy that ensued eventually caused the cancellation of the operation. -- from Book Jacket.

More Books:

Herbicidal Warfare
Language: en
Pages: 289
Authors: Paul Frederick Cecil
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1986 - Publisher: Praeger Pub Text

In 1961, the United States Air Force began using chemical herbicides as a weapon in South-east Asia. The tactic lasted only ten years, but the controversy it provoked continues to this day. Criticisms range from the charge that the herbicides did irreparable damage to the Asian environment to the recent
The Invention of Ecocide
Language: en
Pages: 245
Authors: David Zierler
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011 - Publisher: University of Georgia Press

As the public increasingly questioned the war in Vietnam, a group of American scientists deeply concerned about the use of Agent Orange and other herbicides started a movement to ban what they called “ecocide.” David Zierler traces this movement, starting in the 1940s, when weed killer was developed in agricultural
Chemical Weaponry
Language: en
Pages: 230
Authors: Edward M. Spiers
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 1989-05-05 - Publisher: Springer

Chemical weapons are still a viable military option. This book assesses their appeal by examining how the agents, munitions and protective equipment of chemical warfare have evolved since 1915; how technological innovations and refinements in weaponry have altered tactical assumptions; and how these weapons have been employed in conflicts from
Nation-States and the Global Environment
Language: en
Pages: 368
Authors: Erika Marie Bsumek, David Kinkela, Mark Atwood Lawrence
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-04-02 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

Hardly a day passes without journalists, policymakers, academics, or scientists calling attention to the worldwide scale of the environmental crisis confronting humankind. While climate change has generated the greatest alarm in recent years, other global problems-desertification, toxic pollution, species extinctions, drought, and deforestation, to name just a few-loom close behind.
The Politics of Readjustment
Language: en
Pages: 285
Authors: Wilbur Scott
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-09-04 - Publisher: Routledge

Veterans of all wars face a demanding task in readjusting to civilian life. Vietnam veterans have borne an additional burden, having returned from a controversial war that ended in defeat for the United States and South Vietnam. To address this situation, leaders among the Vietnam veterans and their allies formed