More Books:

Biblical Hermeneutics
Language: en
Pages: 224
Authors: Stanley E. Porter, Jr., Beth M. Stovell
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-04-25 - Publisher: InterVarsity Press

This book presents proponents of five approaches to biblical hermeneutics and allows them to respond to each other. The five approaches are the historical-critical/grammatical (Craig Blomberg), redemptive-historical (Richard Gaffin), literary/postmodern (Scott Spencer), canonical (Robert Wall) and philosophical/theological (Merold Westphal) views.
Biblical Hermeneutics
Language: en
Pages: 511
Authors: Milton Spenser Terry
Categories: Bible
Type: BOOK - Published: 1890 - Publisher:

Books about Biblical Hermeneutics
Principles of Biblical Hermeneutics
Language: en
Pages: 154
Authors: J. Edwin Hartill
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 1947 - Publisher: Solid Christian Books

Dr. S. Franklin Logsdon, Bible teacher and evangelist, says of this book: "These principles of Bible study by Dr. J. Edwin Hartill have been tested and proved in his own personal teaching for many years. They are succinct, pointed, practical, original, understandable -- simple keys to unlock the storehouse of
Introduction to Biblical Hermeneutics
Language: en
Pages: 302
Authors: Walter C. Kaiser, Jr., Mois├ęs Silva
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-08-19 - Publisher: Zondervan

Since its publication in 1994, An Introduction to Biblical Hermeneutics has become a standard text for a generation of students, pastors, and serious lay readers. This second edition has been substantially updated and expanded, allowing the authors to fine-tune and enrich their discussions on fundamental interpretive topics. In addition, four
Reception Theory and Biblical Hermeneutics
Language: en
Pages: 344
Authors: David Paul Parris
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-01-01 - Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

Traditional methods employed in biblical interpretation involve a two-way dialogue between the text and the reader. Reception theory expands this into a three-way dialogue, with the third partner being the history of the text's interpretation and application. Most contemporary biblical interpreters have ignored this third partner, although recently the need